theparisreview:

Donald Evans started collecting stamps when he was about six years old. When he was ten, he became preoccupied with building miniature communities. He would build sand towns and houses on the beach. Indoors, he made little villages on top of the family ping-ping table. Quite soon it occurred to Evans that he could make his villages more real by making stamps for them, and by the time he was fifteen he had made 1,000 stamps from about forty different countries. Pictured is a stamped envelope from a country called Domino. As Evans remarks in his portfolio, “This envelope is unaddressed, though sometimes I have addressed them to made-up people from that country or even real people.”

theparisreview:

Donald Evans started collecting stamps when he was about six years old. When he was ten, he became preoccupied with building miniature communities. He would build sand towns and houses on the beach. Indoors, he made little villages on top of the family ping-ping table. Quite soon it occurred to Evans that he could make his villages more real by making stamps for them, and by the time he was fifteen he had made 1,000 stamps from about forty different countries. Pictured is a stamped envelope from a country called Domino. As Evans remarks in his portfolio, “This envelope is unaddressed, though sometimes I have addressed them to made-up people from that country or even real people.”

peashooter85:

Fun History Fact,
Unlike their depiction in the film The Last Samurai, the Samurai of the Satsuma Rebellion were armed with British and Russian rifles, revolvers, 30 cannon, and 30 mortars.

peashooter85:

Fun History Fact,

Unlike their depiction in the film The Last Samurai, the Samurai of the Satsuma Rebellion were armed with British and Russian rifles, revolvers, 30 cannon, and 30 mortars.

“What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: ‘This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more’ … Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: ‘You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.”

– Friedrich Nietzsche

“You can’t just start the clock on 9/11 and forget 50 years of unjust oppressive Western foreign policies in the Middle East.”

Medhi Hasan

Thank God someone finally said this. I’m so sick of stating that Western intervention and invasion of other countries fuels terrorism only for people to respond 'They did 9/11 first!' 

In 1953 the UK & the US staged a coup of the democratically elected leader of Iran and installed a dictator who was more to their liking. Today the US continues to support brutal dictators (such as in Saudi Arabia) where it suits them to do so. Palestine has been occupied for decades. The list of Western imperial foreign policies over the past decades could go on and on.

9/11 was not only a result religious extremism and it certainly was not because 'they hate our freedoms.' Terrorism is often primarily politically motivated and anyone who is serious about preventing it had better take some fucking notice of this fact.

(via insideonemind)

“Man shouldn’t be able to see his own face—there’s nothing more sinister. Nature gave him the gift of not being able to see it, and of not being able to stare into his own eyes. Only in the water of rivers and ponds could he look at his face, and the very posture he has to assume was symbolic: he has to bend over; stoop down, to commit the ignominy of beholding himself.
The inventor of the mirror poisoned the human heart.”

– Fernando Pessoa, the Book of Disquiet

lastuli:


Walls and Chains, Zuhdi al Aduwi 1980

As of today, there are over 5,200 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli prisons. Considering the majority of those detained are male, the number of Palestinians detained forms approximately 40% of the total male Palestinian population in the occupied Palestinian territories.
There are currently 183 prisoners being held under Administrative Detention; a procedure which allows the Israeli military to hold prisoners indefinitely on secret information without charging them or allowing them to stand trial.
Furthermore, the number of minors held in Israeli prisons is 210 (28 under 16). Not to forget the 12 prisoners currently on hunger strike, 3 of whom are facing serious health problems.
Since these prisoners are being held in Israeli prisons, the families of the prisoners find it almost impossible see their imprisoned relatives since they need to obtain a permit in order to do so. Needless to say that transferring prisoners outside of the occupied territory from which they are detained is illegal under international law.

lastuli:

Walls and Chains, Zuhdi al Aduwi 1980

As of today, there are over 5,200 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli prisons. Considering the majority of those detained are male, the number of Palestinians detained forms approximately 40% of the total male Palestinian population in the occupied Palestinian territories.

There are currently 183 prisoners being held under Administrative Detention; a procedure which allows the Israeli military to hold prisoners indefinitely on secret information without charging them or allowing them to stand trial.

Furthermore, the number of minors held in Israeli prisons is 210 (28 under 16). Not to forget the 12 prisoners currently on hunger strike, 3 of whom are facing serious health problems.

Since these prisoners are being held in Israeli prisons, the families of the prisoners find it almost impossible see their imprisoned relatives since they need to obtain a permit in order to do so. Needless to say that transferring prisoners outside of the occupied territory from which they are detained is illegal under international law.

— Maqamatu Badee’ez-Zamanil-Hamathanii; an Arabic collection from the 9th century of 400 episodic stories, roughly 52 of which have survived.

Original untranslated version of a previous post.

I’m experimenting with transliterating Arabic names into English. That’s why I wrote an-Nabighatuth-Thibaniiu in my last post rather than al Nabigha al Thibani; the latter is harder to make sense of and it doesn’t represent the mechanics of Arabic pronunciation.